U.S. encourages, welcomes qualified Indians: Consul General Edgard Kagan

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U.S. President Donald Trump is “very committed” to relations with India, says Mr. Kagan
As the Trump administration continues to tighten screws on the H-1B visa programme, United States Consul General in Mumbai, Edgard Kagan, says his country encourages and welcomes “qualified Indians”.
U.S. President Donald Trump is “very committed” to relations with India, he told PTI.
“The U.S. continues to be as welcoming as it has always been to qualified Indian travellers,” Mr. Kagan said, adding a record number of Indians flying to the U.S. last year proves that people in India are aware that his country welcomes them.
“We strongly encourage and welcome Indians to study in the U.S. We believe that Indians studying in the U.S. and our students studying in India are part of the glue that holds our relationship together,” he told PTI.
Indians who are in the U.S. continue to have great opportunities there. The country is aware that Indians there want to be treated well.
“If you look at the facts, you will see that the U.S. continues to be just as welcoming as it has always been,” he said.
Responding to another question, he said the U.S. President is “very committed” to relations with India.
“If you look carefully you can see that from the very beginning of his administration, his time in office, the President and his team have emphasised the need to expand and strengthen the already good relations with India,” he said.
“I think part of this is making sure we continue to grow trade in a way that is fair and balanced on both sides, part of it is making sure that both the countries continue to support investment,” he said.
“We welcome and are thrilled with the amount of Indian investments that are coming to the U.S.,” he added.
Mr. Kagan said the U.S. wants to get the right policy framework favouring investments in both the countries and make sure that ties between people of the U.S. and India remain strong.
“The President understands all that Indian-Americans have done in the United States. He also is very proud of what the Americans have done in India and I think we want to find ways to highlight that and expand it,” he said.
Asked about the U.S. withdrawing from the Paris pact on climate change, Mr. Kagan said his country is deeply committed to protecting the environment in the U.S. and in the world.
“We recognise that there always are trade-offs and difficult decisions to be made, but we believe the way in which we go forward is by building popular support for the idea that we all have a shared stake in our world,” he said.