Strikes cause travel mayhem in France, Germany

Strikes cause travel mayhem in France, Germany

Berlin: The estimate was contained in a statement on the passenger numbers of Air France-KLM, which said they had increased by 5.4 percent in March.
The walkouts were set to continue on Tuesday and Wednesday for a total of seven days since the strikes began in February.
The industrial action at Air France, where the French government owns a minority stake, coincides with rolling strikes by workers at the state rail operator SNCF, as well as protests by students, public servants, energy workers and rubbish collectors.
The SNCF said on Monday that the strikes against plans to overhaul the debt-laden company had already cost it around 100 million euros.
Although the various protests have different aims, they have created a general atmosphere of social discontent as President Emmanuel Macron pursues his ambitious reform drive.
Members of German public sector workers union Verdi stage a strike at the airport in demand for higher wages in Frankfurt, Germany April 10, 2018
Members of German public sector workers union Verdi stage a strike at the airport in demand for higher wages in Frankfurt, Germany April 10, 2018 (Reuters)
Public sector strikes hits Germany
In the neighbouring country of France, thousands of passengers at four German airports, including the biggest hub Frankfurt, were also stranded on Tuesday as ground staff and other public sector workers staged walkouts across the country to increase the pressure in a pay dispute.
Lufthansa said on Monday it was cancelling more than 800 of its planned 1,600 flights on Tuesday and Frankfurt airport operator Fraport has warned of disruption.
Members of German public sector workers union Verdi stage a strike at the airport in demand for higher wages in Frankfurt, Germany April 10, 2018.
Members of German public sector workers union Verdi stage a strike at the airport in demand for higher wages in Frankfurt, Germany April 10, 2018. (Reuters)
As well as Frankfurt, airports in Munich, Cologne and Bremen were hit. The industrial action also affected nurseries, rubbish collection services and swimming pools in several German states.
“We want to send a clear signal to employers with these massive strikes,” Frank Bsirske, head of Verdi, Germany’s biggest labour union for service sector employees, said.